Coal tit (Parus ater)

2
230

Bird Fact:

Length: 11 cm.
The male and female have like plumage.
Voice: In spring the characteristic ‘seetoo seetoo seetoo’, the courting call a soft sissi-sissi-sissi’, and a scolding ‘chi-chi-chich’.
Size of Egg: 13.3 – 16.8 x 10.15 – 12.1 mm

The coal tit is a bird of tall but not very deep coniferous forests, from lowland to mountain elevations, distributed throughout the whole of Europe except the northernmost parts. Its range extends eastward as far as Kamchatka and southern China and it is found also in northwest Africa.

It prefers pine woods but is plentiful also in spruce stands. In some parts of Great Britain and Ireland, it may also be found in mixed woods and in the mountain areas of southern Europe among beechwoods. Individuals from central, western and southern Europe are resident as a rule, whereas populations from eastern and northern Europe migrate in vast numbers to central Europe for the winter. Such journeys, however, are not undertaken regularly.

At the end of April the coal tit builds its nest of moss in a tree cavity; if there is a scarcity of these it will use hollow tree stumps, ground burrows, or rock crevices, lining the inside with hairs. It would also welcome a nesting box. The female lays 7 to 11 eggs, which she alone incubates for a period of 14 to 15 days, rarely a day more or less. The young are fed insects, insect larvae and spiders by both parents.

They leave the nest at the age of 16 to 17 days, but continue to be fed by the adult birds for another two weeks. Having reared one brood the coal tit has a second, usually in July. Following the nesting period, the birds form flocks, roaming the woods of the surrounding countryside together with other tits, generally passing the night singly in tree cavities.

You may also know about:

Redwing – (Turdus Iliacus)

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here